Malala Yousafzai: speaking truth neither exaggerating nor suppressing (VIDEO)

Published by Greg Heffron on

Malala Yousafzai speaks to the U.N.In her historic speech to the United Nations, 16 year old Malala Yousafzai demonstrates a perfect example of the mindful communication principle of “speaking truth, neither exaggerating nor suppressing.” Her words reveal that true power comes from reflecting our human experience as it actually is. If Malala cried for vengeance or focused simply on her own personal hurt, she wouldn’t have as much potential to change the situations she’s speaking about. If she’d hidden herself away and said nothing — a perfectly understandable reaction — then her power would be suppressed and she could have little effect. [cc_blockquote_right]Our words can change the whole world. Because we are all together, united for the cause of education. And if we want to achieve our goal, then let us empower ourselves with the weapon of knowledge. And let us shield ourselves with unity and togetherness.[/cc_blockquote_right] Instead, she takes a brave “we-first” approach to speaking truth that reaches into the human heart directly, commanding a standing ovation from the entire U.N. Bravo Malala. May we take you as an example when we’re frustrated, in pain, and faced with seemingly overwhelming odds.

From her speech: “Our words can change the whole world. Because we are all together, united for the cause of education. And if we want to achieve our goal, then let us empower ourselves with the weapon of knowledge. And let us shield ourselves with unity and togetherness.”

The full speech can be viewed here.

Interestingly, within days, the leadership of the Taliban felt the need to make a statement regretting Malala’s shooting. While hardly an apology, senior Taliban leader Adnan Rasheed claimed that he had “brotherly feelings” for Malala — a rather unprecedented level of civility for the Taliban.


Greg Heffron

Greg Heffron

Greg Heffron directs Green Zone Institute. He was the first certified teacher of Mindful Communication authorized by Susan Gillis Chapman. He has been teaching Mindful Communication workshops since 2009, and has been a mindfulness meditation teacher since 2005. In 2005, he apprenticed with senior Mudra Space Awareness teacher Craig Smith, and became authorized to teach this unique mind-body meditation technique — included in nearly every workshop. In 2007, Greg co-taught with Smith to fourth year students in the Dance Division at the Julliard School in New York. Greg has taught Mindful Communication and Mudra Space Awareness workshops in Holland, France, Belgium, Poland, Ukraine and across North America. In 2003 Greg graduated with an MFA in Nonfiction Creative Writing from the University of Iowa. He coaches individuals, teaches workshops, and consults with businesses and organizations like Shambhala Mountain Center, Dechen Choling Buddhist Retreat Center and others.